Kwanzaa Crafts

Kwanzaa Crafts

Gifts and Decorations for A Meaningful and Festive Celebration

Book - 1998
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Drape your home in the traditional African red, green, and black, and celebrate Kwanzaa in high style with this brightly illustrated collection of stories, crafts, poetry, and recipes. It goes day by day, presenting the principles, symbols, and candles for each. On the first strive for umoja: unity in the family, community, nation, and race. Light a black candle, and set out a mazao, or basket of fruits, vegetables, and nuts -- which you can make yourself, along with a delicious Nigerian Mango salad. Instructions cover wreaths, a colorful kente-cloth tunic top, a mkeka or woven-straw placemat, a Kwanzaa banner, scrapbook, and decoupaged kinara -- the ritual candleholder. With these glorious projects you're sure to remember the principle of the sixth day: Kuumba -- or creativity!
Publisher: New York : Sterling Publishing, [1998]
Copyright Date: ©1998
ISBN: 9780806917771
0806917776
Branch Call Number: 745.5941 M231
Characteristics: 127 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm

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EuSei Jul 06, 2011

Professor Dr. Maulana Ron Karenga, a marxist and creator of “Kwanzaa,” was convicted in 1971 he for the torture and assault of two women. His “kwanzaa” principles are clearly derived from communism. The color scheme he conceived (red, black and green), “conicidently” was first introduced in the US in 1920 by Marcus Garvey and represented the African Nationalistic movement: red for blood, black for the skin color, and green for the land they seeked. From the Kwanzaa Information Center: “We lost our land through blood; and we cannot gain it except through blood. We must redeem our lives through the blood. Without the shedding of blood there can be no redemption of this race,” and “[the flag is a] symbol of devotion for African people in America to establish an independent African nation on the North American Continent.” Nuff said? While the Constitution protects free speech, it certainly does not extend the same protection to separationist, racitst speech. Shame that our libraries are encouraging this kind of attitude.

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