The Poet X

The Poet X

Book - 2018
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Xiomara Batista, the daughter of devout immigrants, discovers the power of slam poetry and begins participating in a school club as part of her effort to understand her mother's strict religious beliefs and her own developing relationship to the world.
Publisher: New York, NY : HarperTeen, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2018.
Edition: First edition.
ISBN: 9780062662804
0062662805
Branch Call Number: YF ACEVEDO
Characteristics: 361 pages ; 22 cm

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Raised by Dominican parents in Harlem, Xiomara pours her heart into her poetry in this novel in verse.


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JCLTiffanyR Apr 19, 2019

The Poet X has won multiple awards and for good reason. It's a powerful novel with a strong, yet vulnerable female voice. Told in free verse, this is a lightning-fast read with some serious depth. Xiomara Batista feels stifled by her religious mother, who resents her for her bodacious curves that suggest sin. Poetry is Xiomara's outlet and what a powerful outlet it is. You'll root for Xiomara to find her voice as the Poet X.

OPL_MichelleC Apr 11, 2019

When I finished National Book Award winner The Poet X, I felt chills. Powerful, descriptive narrative poetry that details a story of first love, family, and religion. I was awed, shocked, warmed, saddened, angered, and calmed.

VaughanPLKim Apr 10, 2019

I'm not usually a fan of poetry or reading novels in verse, but I really enjoyed this book. Xiomara is such a well-written character and her voices really shines through in her poetry. Her struggle to be who she wants to be rather than who her parents want her to be is one that many teens will relate to.

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pink_panda_1782
Apr 04, 2019

One of the best things about a novel in verse is how immediate the character’s voice can feel. Xiomara is an outstanding character who is trying to figure out how to express herself and coming to terms with the fact that what her church teaches (and her mother staunchly believes) does not reflect the world as she sees it or the way she wants to live. She is sharp, witty, and always bracing for a fight, and some of my favorite poems are the contrasts between what she wants to say and what she actually feels she can say (e.g., her homework assignments).

a
anneelliot
Mar 14, 2019

Beautiful and powerful--my favorite read so far this year! I saw and heard Elizabeth Acevedo give a powerful reading from it at the Portland Book Festival in November, and though I'm not normally an audiobook fan, I will definitely be listening to the audio version as well.

hockeymdm Mar 07, 2019

Amazing Listen!

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WoodneathTaylor
Mar 06, 2019

Imagine a soft embrace before being gut-punched - that's the emotional upheaval The Poet X put me through. I highly encourage the audiobook for this one- it is truly an experience. I could compare the production and performance to The Hate U Give - the voice really adds a layer of experience and enjoyment to the story overall.

JCLHeatherC Mar 01, 2019

Beautifully written and heartbreakingly honest.

IndyPL_AmyF Feb 25, 2019

The Poet X, beautifully written in verse, is an engaging coming-of- age story about high school student Xiamora Batista who is a talented poet. Xiamora’s struggles with the social and artistic limitations imposed by her strict mother are handled with sensitivity and insight. The book is dramatic without melodrama – the characters are developed so that the reader gains insight and understanding into their behavior and motivations. This is a must-read!

mko123 Feb 11, 2019

Xia feels like she wants to explode. She is getting pressure from her mother to be as devout Catholic as she is, by boys who make cat calls at her, and now she has to sneak time with Anon, her chemistry partner who she really likes. Her only solace is in writing poetry in her secret journals. When Xia's carefully guarded world starts to unravel, Xia must find the courage to speak her truth. This is is quick read with a lot of depth and power. It is well deserving of the Printz award for Young Adult Literature. I recommend it to anyone who is struggling with finding their voice.

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pink_panda_1782
Apr 04, 2019

pink_panda_1782 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 13 and 25

OPL_KrisC Jun 13, 2018

OPL_KrisC thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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pink_panda_1782
Apr 04, 2019

http://richincolor.com/2018/03/review-the-poet-x/

Review: Note: The Poet X includes physical and religious abuse, sexual harassment, and references to homophobia.

One of the best things about a novel in verse is how immediate the character’s voice can feel. Xiomara is an outstanding character who is trying to figure out how to express herself and coming to terms with the fact that what her church teaches (and her mother staunchly believes) does not reflect the world as she sees it or the way she wants to live. She is sharp, witty, and always bracing for a fight, and some of my favorite poems are the contrasts between what she wants to say and what she actually feels she can say (e.g., her homework assignments).

The Poet X is a great coming of age story. Xiomara pretty much does it all—falling in love, questioning religion, clashing with family, finding an outlet for her passion, calling out rape culture and sexism—and good times and the bad help her discover who she truly is and what she believes. Xiomara discovering and falling in love with slam poetry while we’re reading her poetry is a beautiful experience. It made me want to pull up some of my favorite Sarah Kay videos (yes, I had a slam poetry phase in my 20s) and just put them on repeat.

Even without knowing author Elizabeth Acevedo’s impressive and extensive body of slam poetry work, her love for the form was clear throughout the book. And so was Xiomara’s. I loved every time Xiomara made it to the poetry club or interacted with the other members, especially Ms. Galiano. Women mentoring other women is one of my favorite things, and having this teacher repeatedly reach out to Xiomara and encourage her talents was honestly inspiring.

But Xiomara’s story isn’t just a steady upward climb of honing her poetic talents; it touches on several more difficult topics. She is keenly aware of how much rape culture permeates her life and how much her mother buys into it and into the church’s sexism. There are some awful, painful scenes where Xiomara is punished (or insulted) for her budding sexuality and religious doubt. While there is a mostly hopeful conclusion to some of this, it left me concerned that Xiomara had only really bought herself some breathing space with her mother. (But that’s my pessimistic self.)

The romantic relationship between Xiomara and Aman is very well done, and Aman is one of the many interesting supporting characters in the book. One of the best traits a romantic lead can have, in my opinion, is consistently demonstrating a desire to listen. When Xiomara felt like she had to be silent, Aman was there, encouraging her with her poetry. (Another excellent trait is knowing when to apologize and how to make up for doing wrong.) I was also very fond of Twin (Xiomara’s twin brother, Xavier) and Caridad, as well as Ms. Galiano.

http://richincolor.com/2018/03/review-the-poet-x/

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