One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

eBook - 1962
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Publisher: New York : Signet, 1962.
ISBN: 9781429535991
1429535997
9781429535960
1429535962
Characteristics: 325 pages ; 19 cm

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p
pacdg
Aug 21, 2017

very telling and frightening allegorical tale of institutional control of people

AL_TINA Jul 31, 2017

If you've only seen the movie, you're missing out. McMurphy is a quintessential charismatic protagonist - flawed, but wholly likable. Kesey's rendering of the this character through the eyes of a fellow patient adds a level of depth not possible in a visual format. The narrator's backstory is heartbreaking as well and has literary merit worthy of its own exploration.

d
darladoodles
Apr 17, 2017

The reputation of this book made me expect it would be a more interesting read. I was determined to slog through it, but did not find many times when I was glad I was reading it. The subject matter is heavy and we are introduced into the mind of one of the inmates of the asylum to see how the ward and the staff look to him. It is dark and depressing and its tone reminded me of Catch-22.

Not sure I even want to try and watch the movie, but Jack Nicholson as McMurphy intrigues me. Perhaps watching the story on film will giving me a new appreciation of the book?

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Mar 21, 2017

Ken Kesey's most famous novel, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest is an, at times, surrealist novel that follows a male psychiatric ward in the 1950's turned upside down by the arrival of patient Randle Patrick McMurphy, a manly man who battles with Nurse Ratched, the totalitarian female nurse. Full of symbolism, Kesey's novel is often tough to read at times and would appear as misogynistic in these times: Nurse Ratched is nothing but a corrupt woman in power who wants to "emasculate" the men of their dignity and is ultimately attacked by McMurphy. However, the book is still in the canon and should be read if only for that reason. The male patients, such as Chief Bromden and Billy Bibbit are interesting and sympathetic characters that you feel for. McMurphy? Not so much.
- @reallylikesmusicals of the Teen Review Board at the Hamilton Public Library

TSCPL_ChrisB Jun 02, 2016

Once the plot picks up there is a decent story. All the characters are entertaining. The supporting characters are well-crafted. It was good. Maybe a little better than good. But for me, it wasn't the makings of a classic

j
JackPurcell
Apr 01, 2015

One of those books that couldn't be approached by the movie, Kesey did it so well. The best Ken Kesey ever wrote. Great book. Even if you saw the movie, you'll love it.

p
palaminopony
Mar 03, 2015

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” is told from the point of view of ‘Chief’ Bromden, a towering, half Native American man stuck in an Oregon psychiatric hospital. Bromden observes the daily lives of the other patients, and watches as they passively suffer under the supposed ‘leadership’ of their main provider, Nurse Ratched. The patients’ normally uneventful lives are quickly ruffled by the arrival of a new patient, the loud and boisterous Randle McMurphy, who quickly has them questioning the iron rule of Nurse Ratched. As things in the hospital become more and more tense, Bromden is soon roped into McMurphy’s schemes.

This novel is an extremely enjoyable read. While “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” does start off slow, it quickly picks up and never slows down again. The characters are all unique and believable, and each one’s illness is well-researched. Each character helps to bring out the best and worst of the other characters, creating an interesting group dynamic. The plot is funny yet serious, as it deals with real issues of the time period and setting in a darkly humorous way. The mental hospital is an interesting setting, as it feels both spacious and cramped, and helps to bring across messages and ideas without them being forwardly said.

Overall, the author of this review highly recommends “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”. It would make a great essay book or ‘book talk’ book, as it has lots of symbolism and deeper meanings. The author of this review believes this novel to be suitable for ages fourteen and up.

PimaLib_Teens Feb 23, 2015

The characters were engaging and strong. The writing style was unique and intriguing. It reflects the psychedelic era of the 1960s. I really enjoyed reading this and it stuck with me.

n
Nymeria23
Dec 05, 2014

This book was pretty sane for being crazy. I liked this book, though I struggled in trying to finish it because it brought to life some of my fears of being branded insane and it showed life from the patients' point of view. I thought Chief was relatable and had interesting character development, seeming to grow and ;get bigger' as the story went on. I actually understand some of the deeper meanings behind his references, which is wasn't expecting from this book. The only part that got me really confused was the night he didn't take his pills and dreamed that the ward got dropped into a dungeon where machines strung up people. That was a little strange for my tastes. I hated Miss Ratched and loved McMurphy. The ending took me completely by surprise, and I loved and hated it as well. All around good, interesting read.

AtomicSpatula Mar 29, 2014

An eye opening but amazing novel. It was a little rough at some parts, however, the overall quality of this book cannot be denied. McMurphy, the protagonist, not only has his own limits put to the test, but his friends are also tempted and tested as well, making this novel's protagonist seem more whole than many others. Kesey has done an amazing job not only giving the audience an amazing story, but also a very waking picture of mental institutions of the time.

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Slavomir Jan 17, 2011

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

Slavomir Jan 17, 2011

Violence: This title contains Violence.

Slavomir Jan 17, 2011

Sexual Content: This title contains Sexual Content.

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AmandaVollmershausen Mar 23, 2013

AmandaVollmershausen thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Slavomir Jan 17, 2011

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Halfbloodprincess Jun 16, 2013

To Vik Lovell, who told me dragons did not exist, then led me to their lairs.

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