Till We Have Faces

Till We Have Faces

A Myth Retold

Book - 2012
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This tale of two princesses-one beautiful and one unattractive-and of the struggle between sacred and profane love is Lewis's reworking of the myth of Cupid and Psyche and one of his most enduring works. This reinterpretation of the tale of Cupid and Psyche, combines elements of barbarism and fantasy with an understanding of human nature and psychology.
Publisher: Boston, Mass. : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012.
Edition: First Mariner books edition.
Copyright Date: ©1956
ISBN: 9780156904360
0156904365
Branch Call Number: F
Characteristics: 313 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm

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v
Volfie
Mar 17, 2017

Could hardly be better, rewarding the reader's engagement while crafting a compelling new vision of a timeless story.

g
guardiansgirl114
Nov 23, 2014

I loved this book! I'd never heard of the story of cupid and psyche till I had to read this book in 8th grade for literature class but I'm glad I did because it's a wonderful book! I just adore any thing by C.S.Lewis!

a
Annie1318
Dec 14, 2013

This was a beautifully written story about an ugly sister who tells the story as a sort of memoir. The first 'book' expresses her anger with the gods, but the second book is her older and wiser take on the first book. I never wanted the second book to end and the ending made me feel so peaceful that I wanted to laugh and cry and everything all at once.

c
Cassisa
Dec 13, 2012

A unique retelling of Cupid and Psyche story, told from the view point of Psyche's sister. A classic!

c
cmposey
Apr 26, 2011

C.S. Lewis considers this his best work. It was slow starting. I kept thinking "why did he like this one so much". In the end I liked it too, I still like the Narnia series best and think they are truly his best works.

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lnarizny
May 10, 2013

When the time comes to you at which you will be forced at last to utter the speech which has lain at the center of your soul for years, which you have, all that time, idiot-like, been saying over and over, you'll not talk about the joy of words. I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces?

l
ladytigressa
Jun 10, 2008

The Divine Nature wounds and perhaps destroys us merely by being what it is.

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ladytigressa
Jun 10, 2008

“No, no, no,” she said. “You don’t understand. Not that kind of longing. It was when I was happiest that I longed most. It was on happy days when we were up there on the hills, the three of us, with the wind and the sunshine… where you couldn’t see Glome or the palace. Do you remember? The colour and the smell, and looking across the Grey Mountain in the distance? And because it was so beautiful, it set me longing, always longing. Somewhere else there must be more of it. Everything seemed to be saying, Psyche, come! But I couldn’t (not yet) come and I didn’t know where I was to come to. It almost hurt me. I felt like a bird in a cage when the other birds of its kind are flying home.”

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